Why Courts Need Document Management AND Case Management Systems

Document Management System (DMS) needs should be identified holistically, not just for the needs of the courtroom processes. A successful implementation will be gained through a well thought out plan and a DMS solution that can not only integrate with a courts Case Management System (CMS), but also with Fiscal, HR, Procurement, and other department’s line-of-business systems.

To accomplish a successful implementation of an electronic environment there has to be an overall vision and buy-in from all the key individuals of the court system.

  • Culture and vision which incorporates technology as part of the business strategy
  • Identify areas to integrate technology with the courts business strategies
  • Implementation of an electronic DMS to be used by all departments
  • Integration of the DMS with CMS and other line-of-business systems
  • Provide public access to documents via a web portal (e-Access)

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ImageSource implements groundbreaking paperless courtroom solution, featuring ILINX® technologies

Stanislaus County Superior Court is a pioneer in digital courtroom document processing, as featured in a recent article in the Modesto Bee. Not mentioned in the article is the fact that their successful solution was implemented by ImageSource and features ILINX technologies.

Stanislaus had the vision, and we helped them get there. The technologies used—ILINX Capture and IBM FileNet—have been designated as a solution of choice by the California Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC). The addition of ILINX eForms was added to further streamline courtroom processes. The powerful combination of technologies used offers a robust, scalable and easy-to-use option to automate courtroom processes enterprise-wide.

The family court division has been paperless since early spring of 2014 and is being expanded to traffic, civic and criminal cases, and eventually to the entire courthouse. Clerks search for, and organize documents for upcoming cases based on a web calendar. Judges and commissioners access documents during cases on tablets while on the bench, eliminating a daily stack of about 40 paper case files. Legal documents that require completion during a hearing are now electronic and are filled out, reviewed, approved, signed and routed for printing on the spot. Continue reading