Enterprise content management in higher education

The Times They Are A Changing

Change. Change on college campuses in administrative systems has historically been slow. Most universities still admit and manage students using a complex web of people, mail, paper, manual routing and data entry. They know it is inefficient and costly. So why is higher education lagging behind when there is a huge opportunity to gain efficiencies, particularly with the technologies and best practices we have today?

Risks. Rolling out many small software projects across a campus can delay addressing the big picture, and give the illusion of avoiding risk. The need for collaboration and the high cost of managing multiple systems with duplicate data sets are not addressed initially. The risk then becomes in controlling the waste. Somebody is eventually going to add that up.

Future. Though higher education is still in its infancy compared to most sectors, a new awareness of the need to manage unstructured content is gaining momentum. Along with that realization are the departmental process reconfigurations and then it can’t happen fast enough. People in an organization touch and re-use information despite their department of origin. The future is to manage a piece of content once and make it available to those who need it. Continue reading

New Year’s Resolution: Document Imaging

We just rounded out the year 2010 and with a New Year, come New Year’s Resolutions! Many people make personal resolutions whether that’s to lose weight, stop smoking, eat healthier, etc. But the sad truth of the matter that we all know is that many people don’t keep those resolutions or bail out after a few short months.

So how about choosing a resolution that is going to really stick?

It’s still amazing to me how many organizations are still using paper documents. They have to search for documents, pull files, re-file, look for misfiled documents, recreate lost documents, etc. What if I told you that you could capture that information from the paper and convert it into an electronic image and store it for later retrieval?

This process has the potential to save your organization substantial amounts of time, money, labor, resources, etc.

There are a multitude of reasons organizations look to document imaging for their paper-based information. A few of those reasons include information accessibility, security and compliance, and savings in a variety of areas like storage and resources.  According to AIIM (Association for Information and Image Management), it costs $20 in labor to file a document, $120 in labor to find a misfiled document and $220 in labor to reproduce a lost document. Think about how much you can potentially save with document imaging.

You might be thinking that this process will take loads of time and money. If you consider the long-term benefits of creating electronic files, the investment is worth it, as long as you carefully plan and analyze what needs to be done.

I would highly recommend working with a team who has experience in this endeavor and who can help you with document prep, scanning, indexing and storing the documents.

Make 2011 count and get working on your “new” New Year’s Resolution: Document Imaging.

Kristina Parma
Corporate Communications Manager
ImageSource, Inc.